IN YOUR FACE JAM: Flipping Through The Weirdly Subversive “Marvel Swimsuit Specials”

I swear I will stop writing about these comics and posting pics like this.

I mean, just as soon as Marvel releases some sexy man variants.*

*"sexy man" used to denote men that are generally accepted to be sexually attractive and not the specific men that I find sexually attractive

IN YOUR FACE JAM: Brett’s Top 10 Hottest Comic Dudes
I wrote a thing. And I made “trading cards” for all 10. Oh, and you’re welcome for bringing to your attention the fact that Captain America considers the United States Constitution beach reading and enjoys wearing belted Speedos. 
There are a lot of mustaches on this list.

IN YOUR FACE JAM: Brett’s Top 10 Hottest Comic Dudes

I wrote a thing. And I made “trading cards” for all 10. Oh, and you’re welcome for bringing to your attention the fact that Captain America considers the United States Constitution beach reading and enjoys wearing belted Speedos. 

There are a lot of mustaches on this list.

I kinda hope they never start casting the Marvel Netflix series, because speculating about which characters and which actors could pop up in five television series is just too much fun. Especially the street-level characters from the Marvel Universe, most of which haven’t been adapted in the Marvel Cinematic Universe yet. The possibilities!

  • James Wolk as Daredevil
  • Harry Shum Jr. as Iron Fist
  • Terry Crews as Luke Cage
  • Sola Bamis as Misty Knight
  • Rich Sommer as Foggy Nelson
  • Stephanie Beatriz as White Tiger

I can’t think of anyone for Colleen Wing, and Jessica Jones is stumping me too. 

Of course, this is all dependent on Misty, White Tiger, and Colleen appearing on any of these new shows. I hope they do!

IN YOUR FACE JAM: The Marvel Cinematic Universe Needs Foggy Nelson
Some weeks having my own opinion column means writing 1300 words about a comic book character that I have a crush on and then campaigning — hard — for one actor to play him.
I don’t really care who plays Daredevil, but Rich Sommer is Foggy Nelson. And Foggy Nelson is an incredibly important character.

IN YOUR FACE JAM: The Marvel Cinematic Universe Needs Foggy Nelson

Some weeks having my own opinion column means writing 1300 words about a comic book character that I have a crush on and then campaigning — hard — for one actor to play him.

I don’t really care who plays Daredevil, but Rich Sommer is Foggy Nelson. And Foggy Nelson is an incredibly important character.

TAKE FLIGHT WITH CAPTAIN MARVEL PT. 3
This interview series is maybe my favorite thing I’ve ever done for Marvel. Kelly Sue’s answers are great, the subject is great, everything is great. But the most greatest thing of all the things? This answer:

Marvel.com: I assume that every single piece of artwork you get back for a comic you write is special but when you see something like this where you are actually on the cover with Captain Marvel, what was it like to see this cover for the first time? 
Kelly Sue DeConnick: Yeah. It’s hard to talk about in terms that are not embarrassing. It feels like, “You can’t erase me. I’m here.” We come back to conversations about representation and feminism and I can sound like a broken record—and I don’t mean to, but this is my life. And I am a white woman. I am a straight, white woman, so I come to this with mountains of privilege. 
Members of under-represented classes are often made invisible. History wipes us out. It takes away our contributions. It either assigns them to someone else or just makes them go poof. You have to walk this fine line too; I don’t want to exaggerate my own importance or anything but look; I did my part. I carried the baton for a little while. How well I did it is up for someone else to decide, but I did it and it counts. I’m on the cover to a Marvel comic. No one ever gets to take that away from. Literally, they can’t take it away from me—I own it. 

Fantastic.
Read Parts 1 and 2, too.

TAKE FLIGHT WITH CAPTAIN MARVEL PT. 3

This interview series is maybe my favorite thing I’ve ever done for Marvel. Kelly Sue’s answers are great, the subject is great, everything is great. But the most greatest thing of all the things? This answer:

Marvel.com: I assume that every single piece of artwork you get back for a comic you write is special but when you see something like this where you are actually on the cover with Captain Marvel, what was it like to see this cover for the first time?

Kelly Sue DeConnick: Yeah. It’s hard to talk about in terms that are not embarrassing. It feels like, “You can’t erase me. I’m here.” We come back to conversations about representation and feminism and I can sound like a broken record—and I don’t mean to, but this is my life. And I am a white woman. I am a straight, white woman, so I come to this with mountains of privilege.

Members of under-represented classes are often made invisible. History wipes us out. It takes away our contributions. It either assigns them to someone else or just makes them go poof. You have to walk this fine line too; I don’t want to exaggerate my own importance or anything but look; I did my part. I carried the baton for a little while. How well I did it is up for someone else to decide, but I did it and it counts. I’m on the cover to a Marvel comic. No one ever gets to take that away from. Literally, they can’t take it away from me—I own it.

Fantastic.

Read Parts 1 and 2, too.

READ “SUPERIOR FOES OF SPIDER-MAN”

Even if you aren’t reading any other Spider-Man comics, or any other Marvel comics, or have never even read a Marvel comic. If you are a fan of comedy, “Superior Foes of Spider-Man” — inaccessible and off-putting title be damned — is proving on a monthly basis that superhero comics can be as insane and hilarious as the best sitcoms on television.

This book stars a bunch of D-List Marvel villains as they try to level up and pull off a big score. But they’re all idiots. And they do not get along. It’s pretty much “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” with super powers. The series is structured in such a way that even if you’ve never heard of these characters, even if you’ve never read a comic book before, they boil down everything into quick flashbacks and get you caught up. But really, many of these characters and many of these takes on these characters all start with “Superior Foes of Spider-Man” #1. It’s a fresh start.

It’s fantastic.

And if you’re reading and enjoying “Hawkeye,” know that this has the exact same “I can’t believe this is a mainstream super comic” vibe that makes “Hawkeye” feel so special.

Read it. Read it digitally right now.